Official Grades and Scouting Reports: 2019 Wide Receivers

Welcome, to the third of my official draft reports for the 2019 NFL draft. I will be going position by position giving a full report and grade on every player that I have scouted this season. Obviously, I can’t scout every single prospect in the entire country since I am a one man army and a full-time college student. I’ve tried to get at least 20 done at each position, so I think I’ve covered a pretty good chunk of the players who will be drafted. Each article will start with the worst and get to the best, so if you want to skip down to some of the better prospects you can do that.

Each profile will have some biographic data including name, school, year, height, weight, and “Red Flags”. It will also include a numerical value between 1 and 10 that will dictate there placement in the rankings. The number is calculated based on my own personal grading formula for draft prospects. The profile will have a “round grade” that is based on a scale that I will put at the end of this introduction. Round grades are not a prediction of where a player will get drafted, but where I think they should be drafted.  Last but not least, the profiles will include a small paragraph on my overall thoughts on the prospect and some explanation on their NFL outlook. I’ll try to explain some of each players strengths and weaknesses as well.  

As always you can hit me up on twitter (@DanteCollinelli) if you want to discuss my rankings further. I love talking ball with people so please let me know what you think.

 

Grading Scale

 

First-round: 8.75-10

Second-round: 8.74-7.45

Third-round: 7.44-6.15

Fourth round: 6.14-4.85

Fifth round: 4.84-3.55

Sixth round: 3.54- 2.25

Seventh round: 2.24- .095

UDFA: 0.94-0.0  

 

Number 31: Tyre Brady, Marshall

Image result for tyre brady marshall

Class: RS Senior

Height/Weight: 6’3 and 201

Round Grade: 7

Number Grade: 1.61

Red Flags: None

 

Brady has some appealing traits but overall has a long way to go. His short area quickness in and out of breaks is something that popped to me. He only ran vertical routes at Marshall, however, he did have a lot of success with them. You will hear me say this a lot if you read the whole article: I don’t like receivers with bad ball skills (AKA they drop the ball a lot). Brady has too many drops on his tape for my liking. He will have an uphill battle to make a gameday roster.

 

Number 30: Lil’Jordan Humphrey, Texas

Image result for lil jordan humphrey

Class: Junior

Height/Weight: 6’4 and 220

Round Grade: 6

Number Grade: 2.16

Red Flags: None

 

Lil’jordan Humphrey has one of the best names in the draft and, honestly, it may be the best thing he has going for him right now. Humphrey should have gone back to school for his senior season so he could work on his route running, hands, speed, and overall athletic ability. I try to be a positive as possible so I will say that Humphrey made some impressive plays at the catch point and he does a great job in the scramble drill. He might not even get drafted, but I think he could make an impact on special teams.

 

Number 29: Penny Hart, Georgia State

Image result for Penny Hart

Class: RS Junior

Height/Weight: 5’8 and 180

Round Grade: 6

Number Grade: 2.67

Red Flags: None

 

I feel bad because I wanted Penny Hart to be a lot better than he actually is. Hart looked fantastic at the Senior Bowl which put him on my radar. He looked like the perfect slot receiver for today’s NFL with his route running and quickness. The only problem is when you turn on his tape he’s just not that good. I think because his legs moved so fast it gave the illusion to me that he is fast but he ran in the high 4.6s at his Pro-Day. Hart might catch on as someone’s backup slot receiver but he is small and slow which isn’t a great combination.

 

Number 28: Anthony Ratliff-Williams, North Carolina

Image result for anthony ratliff williams nfl

Class: RS Junior

Height/Weight: 6’1 and 205

Round Grade: 6

Number Grade: 2.95

Red Flags: None

 

It is really hard to grade Williams because I feel like a lot of his shortcomings are not his fault. He was used more like a gimmick player and return specialist. Think along the lines of Cordarrelle Patterson. Williams clearly has great speed and overall athletic abilities but he didn’t’ get great chances to showcase them. He has a long way to go as a route runner with limited exposure at UNC. It is tough to judge if Williams is good in contested catch situations because he barely got any chances to make them. Williams is a dynamic enough athlete to be drafted just on the prospect that he will return kicks and punts. He has a slight chance to develop into a consistent deep threat.

 

Number 27: Jalen Hurd, Baylor

Image result for jalen hurd baylor

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’4 and 229

Round Grade: 6

Number Grade: 3.24

Red Flags: None

 

Hurd started his career playing running back at Tennessee in front of Alvin Kamara before transferring to Baylor and becoming a receiver. Honestly, the transition went a lot better than I was expecting for Hurd who showed enough to get drafted this past season. Hurd has the size and build to be a dominant threat over the middle of the field and in the red zone. He is a natural catcher of the ball and picks up a lot of yardage after the catch. Hurd struggles with a lot of the technical parts of playing receiver which can be expected for someone with only one year of experience at the position. Hurd is a long term project but one that I think is worth taking a flyer on during day three of the draft.

 

Number 26: Parris Campbell, Ohio State

Image result for parris campbell

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’0 and 208

Round Grade: 6

Number Grade: 3.39

Red Flags: None

 

Oh boy, out of all of my hot takes this year this might be the hottest one of them all. There are people in major media and on “draft twitter” that think Parris Campbell is a first round player. I just don’t see it at all. Yes, I understand he is one of the fastest players in the country, and he has some great athletic traits. All he did in college was catch shallow crossing routes and take them the distance. He has no idea how to be a good route runner and was never tested in contested catch situations. He has almost no versatility because you have to manufacture touches for him to be effective. He isn’t a receiver right now he’s just an athlete, which is fine for a day three draft pick but not for the first round for crying out loud. Campbell will make a team and might make a couple of splash plays but I don’t see long term production for him in the NFL.

 

Number 25: Travis Fulgham, Old Dominion

Image result for travis fulgham

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’3 and 215

Round Grade: 5

Number Grade: 3.6

Red Flags: None

 

Fulgham’s best weapon is his size which he knows how to employ to make the most of his reps. He was effective in contested catch situations down the field and in the red zone. I thought he had a surprising amount of nuance to his route running for a bigger guy. Nuance points to some upside in his ability to improve as a route runner down the road. Some of the issues with Fulgham center around his lack of quickness and lack of production at ODU. Players from small schools who don’t produce big numbers scare me a little bit because they played against sub-par competition for so long. Fulgham has all the tools needed to be a vertical threat down the field and a red zone ace.

 

Number 24: Ryan Davis, Auburn

Image result for ryan davis auburn

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 5’9 and 175

Round Grade: 5

Number Grade: 3.67

Red Flags: None

 

Look, I know that I’m way higher on Ryan Davis than the NFL is, so if I had to guess he won’t be drafted come April 27th. I’m also aware that Davis is used in a similar fashion to both Parris Campbell and Ratliff-Williams who I killed for being gimmick players.  Here’s the deal, I’ve seen Davis do some impressive route running at the shrine game and on his tape that is better than the guys mentioned above. He is almost as fast as Campbell and further along in the process than Campbell is. Does he still have a long way to go? Yes, he does. He is higher for me because I think he does more receiver things than Campbell does. Davis will be used in a similar fashion as Cordarrelle Patterson if he makes an NFL team.

 

Number 23: Stanley Morgan, Jr, Nebraska

Image result for stanley morgan jr

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’0 and 201

Round Grade: 5

Number Grade: 3.95

Red Flags: None

 

Morgan is someone I found pretty late in the process while I was watching tape on Nebraska’s running back Devine Ozigbo. Morgan does a good job of quickly snapping off his routes and plucking the ball out of the air away from his body. Morgan was tasked with running a much more diverse route tree than most college receivers, which I love to see. My concerns with Morgan are around his athletic abilities. He didn’t look very smooth or bendy on tape, especially in his hips. His play strength is a little lacking as well so he might struggle a lot against press coverage. Morgan projects as a “big slot” receiver at the next level that make a living as a matchup nightmare.

 

Number 22: Anthony Johnson, Buffalo

Image result for anthony johnson buffalo

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’2 and 201

Round Grade: 5

Number Grade: 4.05

Red Flags: None

 

I had the pleasure of scouting Johnson in person this year when Buffalo played Temple in week two (heartbreaking loss btw). My favorite thing about Johnson is how effective he is making tough catches outside of his body. He has natural strong hands that just pluck the ball out of the air. He also provides some level of versatility being able to play on the outside and in the slot. Johnson had a lot of problems separating at Buffalo which is pretty concerning. He made a living catching deep passes but he rarely ran straight by someone. He isn’t very quick so he has trouble creating space as a route runner as well. Johnson’s best shot in the NFL is to be used as a “big slot” guy and just try to outmuscle defenders for the ball.  

 

Number 21: Hunter Renfrow, Clemson

Image result for hunter renfrow

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 5’10 and 185

Round Grade: 5

Number Grade: 4.15

Red Flags: None

 

Every single season there is one small white receiver who dominates in the slot that you know is gonna at least one team better (cough, cough, The Patriots). Renfrow runs some truly beautiful routes and creates consistent separation from his corners at all levels of the field. Renfrow has made some of the biggest catches on some of the biggest stages in college football so he’s no doubt a clutch performer. He has great hands and almost never drops the ball when it’s thrown where he can get to it. All of the knocks on Renfrow are the same ones for short white slot receivers everywhere. He isn’t a great athlete and he is limited because of his size. Let me tell you something though: don’t bet against him finding NFL success.

 

Number 20: Emmanuel Hall, Missouri

Image result for Emmanuel Hall

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’2 and 200

Round Grade: 5

Number Grade: 4.31

Red Flags: Plenty of injuries over the years

 

If you couldn’t tell already, receivers with speed as the best trait kinda scare me as an analyst. In Hall’s defense, he is one of the better pure speed guys this draft has to offer. Hall averaged 23 yards per a catch at Missouri because every route he ran down the field was a “go” route. My concerns with Hall are that he has no idea how to run routes and that he drops way too many passes. I don’t know why people want to think that drops suddenly go away at the next level but it is very rare that they do so receivers with inconsistent hands scare me. Hall has the ability to be a true deep threat at the next level with his speed and ball tracking ability.

 

Number 19: Jacobi Myers, NCST

Image result for Jacobi Meyers

Class: RS Junior

Height/Weight: 6’2 and 203

Round Grade: 5

Number Grade: 4.4

Red Flags: None

 

I’ve been saying this a lot recently, Meyers best spot to make an impact at the next level is as a “big slot”. He has the chops to work the middle of the field with quick breaks in his routes and soft hands. Meyers is pretty limited though when you break down his tape. He doesn’t run a lot of vertical routes and it doesn’t seem like he has the speed to burn people down the field. Overall, he is gonna have to work hard on his footwork and speed if he wants to stick at the next level.

 

Number 18: Keeshaun Johnson, Fresno State

Image result for Keesean Johnson

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’1 and 201

Round Grade: 5

Number Grade: 4.68

Red Flags: None

 

Johnson’s best weapon is his ability to create separation with route running and good footwork. He always seemed to open up easy throwing windows for his quarterback. He ran a fairly varied route tree in college when compared to a lot of the other receivers in this class. Johnson surprised me with his ball skills at times jumping up into the air to make some eye-popping catches. Johnson starts to run into some issues when you dig into his athletic profile. He isn’t very fast and although I have seen out jump some guys he doesn’t do it very often. It doesn’t look like he has the needed acceleration to be a threat after the catch either. Johnson projects as a tweener between the slot and the outside.

 

Number 17: Dillon Mitchell, Oregon

Image result for Dillon Mitchell

Class: Junior

Height/Weight: 6’3 and 201

Round Grade: 4

Number Grade: 4.76

Red Flags: None

 

Mitchell is an interesting prospect because he has a lot of traits that I love, but he’s also pretty raw. Mitchell has some impressive short-area quickness that makes him a real threat after the catch. I love the way he makes difficult catches in the air with an explosive vertical and elite body control. Mitchell would be a bit higher on this list if weren’t for having so many drops on his tape. I also see him struggle to track the ball down the field at times which is weird because he has plenty of snaps under his belt. Mitchell projects as a developmental outside receiver who can make plays after the catch.

 

Number 16: Terry Godwin, Georgia

Image result for terry godwin georgia

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 5’11 and 185

Round Grade: 4

Number Grade: 4.95

Red Flags: None

 

Godwin is a fun player to watch on tape because he plays super hard and physical despite his smaller frame. He makes his money using short-area quickness to create separation at the top of routes. He isn’t afraid of going over the middle to put his body on the line to make difficult catches. All receivers from Georgia are good blockers and Godwin is no exception despite being a tiny man. Godwin’s frame does hold him back in a lot of ways like at the catch point where he gets outmuscled pretty often. Godwin will struggle to handle press coverage at the next level because of his frame as well. He can make a living as a slot/outside hybrid for some team.

 

Number 15: David Sills V, West Virginia

Image result for david sills v

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’4 and 205

Round Grade: 4

Number Grade: 5.23

Red Flags: None

 

I feel like this might be a hot take for some people because I have seen most major media members have a much lower grade on Sills. The thing I love most about Sills is that he catches everything. I swear he has glue on his hands at all times like he didn’t drop one ball at the senior bowl. Yes, I am aware that he is a bit slow and unathletic but his combine numbers were a little bit better than expected so he’s not that bad of an athlete. Sills will have an uphill battle in the NFL but there is value for a smart outside receiver who catches everything thrown his way.

 

Number 14: Mecole Hardman, Georgia

Image result for Mecole Hardman

Class: Junior

Height/Weight: 5’10 and 183

Round Grade: 4

Number Grade: 5.29

Red Flags: None

 

Mecole Hardman and his former teammate Terry Godwin are very similar in a lot of ways. They are both short and tough receivers with considerable upside. So what separates Hardman? He is a supreme athlete with blazing speed. I have hated a lot on speed guys in this piece, but Hardman is more than a pure speed guy because he has some actual skill. Like any Georgia receiver, Hardman didn’t get thrown at a lot so it’s tough to say just how good he is at route running. I love Hardman’s upside to turn himself into Tyreek Hill type of player.

 

Number 13: Terry Mclaurin, Ohio State

Image result for terry mclaurin

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’1 and 205

Round Grade: 4

Number Grade: 5.48

Red Flags: None

 

Mclaurin flew onto the scene after he impressed the scouting community at the Senior Bowl. Mclaurin did not get a lot of targets at Ohio State, so he flew under the radar during the entire college football season. Mclaurin is the ideal outside vertical threat that teams look for. He has strong hands and tracks the ball down the field very well. He showed the ability to shake his corner at the top of the route before getting vertical down the field. My concerns with Mclaurin are centered around his ability to make contested catches. He wasn’t given a lot of chances at Ohio State and I wouldn’t describe him as a physical freak.

 

Number 12: Damarkus Lodge, Ole Miss

IMG_2397
Damarkus Lodge

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’1 and 199

Round Grade: 4

Number Grade: 5.58

Red Flags: None

 

Lodge is a tough guy to project because he is all upside and not a lot of finished product. He flashes some amazing ball skills at times where he jumps over people and makes great plays on the sideline. Then he will come back the next drive and drop a ball that is thrown right at him so I just don’t know. He has some impressive athletic traits like bend and quickness which should allow him to improve as a route runner with NFL coaching. If Lodge hits his potential he will be one of the steals of the draft.

 

Number 11: Andy Isabella, UMass

Image result for andy isabella umass

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 5’10 and 190

Round Grade: 3

Number Grade: 6.29   

Red Flags: None

 

Welcome everybody, to the best pure slot receiver in the 2019 draft. Andy Isabella led the entire country in yards this past season and he runs under a 4.40 40-yard dash. He really is a great route runner with nuance in his steps and sure hands to bring in the ball outside of his body. Obviously, with his blazing speed, he can be a solid threat on the outside to just run by guys at times. Isabella runs into all of the same problems that typical slot receiver run into. He’s small so he will struggle against press coverage and will have difficulty making catches outside of his body. Isabella should be someone’s starting slot receiver when the season starts in September.

 

Number 10: Riley Ridley, Georgia

Image result for riley ridley georgia

Class: Junior

Height/Weight: 6’2 and 200

Round Grade: 3

Number Grade: 6.41

Red Flags: None

 

Ridley is a super smooth route runner on par with the best in the class. Ridley showed the ability to go outside of his frame to make catches as well. He was by far the best receiver at Georgia because he could be effective at all three levels of the field. Here is the problem with Ridley though, the dude can’t really run. His 40-yard time was in the 4.70s which is pretty unacceptable for a receiver. I rewatched Ridley’s tape after the combine and you can tell that he is not a blazer. I think Ridley can still be successful on the outside at the next level with his route running and physical tools.

 

Number 9: Deebo Samuel, South Carolina

IMG_2080
Deebo Samuel

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 5’11 and 215

Round Grade: 3

Number Grade: 6.56

Red Flags: Lower body injuries his junior year forced him to come back for senior season.

 

Samuel has taken the long path to the NFL, but he is finally here. Samuel suffered an injury his junior season that forced him to come back for his senior season. Samuel came back and got off to a slow start before turning it on big time in the end. Samuel is incredibly quick and dynamic in the open field making him a touchdown threat every time he touches the ball. I saw him improve his senior season as a route runner as well. I would be amiss if I didn’t mention how good he was at the Senior Bowl because he made some corners look really silly over the week. If Samuel can stay healthy he will be a great inside and outside threat for a team in need of some playmaking.

 

Number 8: Hakeem Butler, Iowa State

Image result for hakeem butler

Class: RS Junior

Height/Weight: 6’6 and 225

Round Grade: 3

Number Grade: 6.63

Red Flags: None

 

Boom! I have got another spicy take for you all in my receiver rankings. This one probably isn’t as hot as my Parris Campbell take, but I know some people that have a first-round grade on Butler. Butler is one of the biggest receivers in this draft class and on tape you can seem bully corner while mossing them down the field. He improved as a route runner over the course of the season which gives him some upside heading into the NFL. So why am I not higher on a six foot six monster who dominated games at times this year? I told you we would be coming back to this a lot; he drops the ball too damn much to me. Guys who drop the ball in college typically drop the ball a lot in the NFL. Butler has all the tools to be a dominant outside threat for a team but needs to work heavily on improving his consistency.

 

Number 7: Antoine Wesley, Texas Tech

Image result for antoine wesley

Class: Junior

Height/Weight: 6’5 and 200

Round Grade: 3

Number Grade: 6.64

Red Flags: None

 

Sleeper alert! Antonie Wesley is my official sleeper pick for the 2019 receiver class. He has great size and amazing body control allowing him to make acrobatic catches down the field. He runs a lot faster for someone of his size, as well, which shows on tape when he is stacking corners on vertical routes. Wesley is one of the best ball trackers in this class due to his quarterback play being less than ideal this past season. Wesley was only a one-year starter at Texas Tech, so he has trouble running a diverse route tree and getting off of press coverage at times. Wesley won’t get drafted before Deebo Samuel or Hakeem Butler in April, but I’m betting on him making a big jump in his play with some NFL coaching.

 

Number 6: Marquise Brown, Oklahoma

IMG_2445
Marquise “Hollywood” Brown

Class: Junior

Height/Weight: 5’10 and 168

Round Grade: 2

Number Grade: 7.46

Red Flags: Foot surgery after the 2019 season.

 

Marquise Brown is an exciting prospect because has elite level speed combined with some real solid receiver traits. He does a nice job as a route runner, despite limited assignments, breaking quickly in and out of his breaks. Brown has the ability to take any pass to the house with his speed and open field juke moves. I liked his ability to track the ball down the field and then secure the catch with a defender on his back. Brown has some really exciting upside because of his natural traits, but his frame holds him back. Brown is rail thin and already banged up before even getting to the league. I think Brown can play on both the outside and the slot, however, you have to be careful about who matches up with him on the outside. If it is a physical press corner then Brown will get washed out of the play quickly.

 

Number 5: JJ Arcega-Whiteside, Stanford

Image result for jj arcega whiteside

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’3 and 225  

Round Grade: 2

Number Grade: 7.55

Red Flags: None

 

Arcega-Whiteside’s tape was actually a pleasant surprise for me. I was expecting a slow receiver who couldn’t run routes and was only effective in the red zone. That could not be farther from the truth because Whiteside is a good route runner for a big man. He has some good burst in and out of breaks allowing him to create some consistent separation down the field. Obviously, the dude is a touchdown machine in the red zone because of his strong hands, ability to play through contact, and amazing body control in the air. Whiteside is not the fastest guy in the world and he doesn’t have the upside of some of the other guys in this class. I think he can be a team’s backup outside receiver (meaning number 3 on the depth chart, still comes with plenty of snaps) day one.

 

Number 4: AJ Brown, Ole Miss

IMG_2077
AJ Brown

Class: Junior

Height/Weight: 6’1 and 225

Round Grade: 2

Number Grade: 7.72

Red Flags: None

 

I have used the term “big slot” a lot in this article so I guess it’s time you meet the granddaddy of them all. Brown played in the slot his entire career at Ole Miss and was incredibly productive despite a crowded receiver room. Brown is an excellent route runner with elite foot speed and speed in and out of his breaks. He showed reliable hands while being able to take on some contact through the catch point. That is a rare trait for a slot player but Brown has it. Athletically, Brown showed some upside with his good performance at the combine so he might get even better down the road. The only thing you can really knock Brown for is that he is only a slot guy. I think Brown has enough physical tools to play on the outside if the matchup is right.

 

Number 3: Kelvin Harmon, North Carolina State

Image result for kelvin harmon

Class: Junior

Height/Weight: 6’3 and 215

Round Grade: 2

Number Grade: 7.92

Red Flags: None

 

I really wish Harmon ran just a little bit faster at the combine because speed was his only big question mark. Harmon uses his huge body effectively to box out defenders and win at the catch point so often it’s a joke. He is actually a pretty nuanced route runner especially at the top of his routes where he will use head fakes and stutter steps to throw off opposing corners.  Harmon has really long arms so he can make a lot of catches outside of his catch radius. Harmon doesn’t have the athletic upside that other guys in the class have, but he can come in and start day one as a teams number two receiver.

 

Number 2: N’Keal Harry, Arizona State

IMG_2078
N’Keal Harry

Class: Junior

Height/Weight: 6’3 and 216

Round Grade: 2

Number Grade: 8.53

Red Flags: None

 

N’Keal Harry started the season as my WR 1 and he really didn’t fall much during the course of the season. I encourage you to go to YouTube and watch some N’Keal Harry highlights if you haven’t yet because they are insane. He has some of the most impressive athletic tools in the class that he combines with strong hands and elite after the catch abilities. The question all year was if Harry was fast enough to be considered an elite receiver prospect. Harry went to the combine and silenced all of the haters running a 4.53 which at his massive size is plenty fast enough. Harry is one of only two receivers in this draft class who I believe can actually be a teams number one receiver because of his upside.

 

Number 1: DK Metcalf, Ole Miss

Image result for dk metcalf

Class: RS Sophomore

Height/Weight: 6’3 and 225

Round Grade: 1

Number Grade: 8.75

Red Flags: Neck Injury ended his sophomore season.

 

This probably shouldn’t come as a surprise to anybody who has actually seen Metcalf play at Ole Miss. Yes, I watched the combine and saw the insane numbers that Metcalf put up but I was not really shocked. Metcalf’s tape is equally impressive with plenty of examples of him running past guys, mossing corners at the catch point, and running over people in the open field. Metcalf showed good natural hands and the ability to hold on to the ball at the catch point through contact. Some people have made a big deal out of Metcalf’s bad agility times at the combine. I understand the concern because you have to be able to bend to play receiver at the next level. First, I think Metcalf can slim down a little bit and get some NFL coaching which should help with his agility. Second, when you put on his tape you can see him create separation with route running. Metcalf is a poor man’s Calvin Johnson and let me tell you that is not a knock on him at all.

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