Official Grades and Scouting Reports: 2019 Guards

Welcome, to the fifth of my official draft reports for the 2019 NFL draft. I will be going position by position giving a full report and grade on every player that I have scouted this season. Obviously, I can’t scout every single prospect in the entire country since I am a one man army and a full-time college student. I’ve tried to get at least 20 done at each position, so I think I’ve covered a pretty good chunk of the players who will be drafted. Each article will start with the worst and get to the best, so if you want to skip down to some of the better prospects you can do that.

 

Each profile will have some biographic data including name, school, year, height, weight, and “Red Flags”. It will also include a numerical value between 1 and 10 that will dictate there placement in the rankings. The number is calculated based on my own personal grading formula for draft prospects. The profile will have a “round grade” that is based on a scale that I will put at the end of this introduction. Round grades are not a prediction of where a player will get drafted, but where I think they should be drafted.  Last but not least, the profiles will include a small paragraph on my overall thoughts on the prospect and some explanation on their NFL outlook. I’ll try to explain some of each players strengths and weaknesses as well.  

 

As always you can hit me up on twitter (@DanteCollinelli) if you want to discuss my rankings further. I love talking ball with people so please let me know what you think.

 

Grading Scale

 

First-round: 8.75-10

Second-round: 8.74-7.45

Third-round: 7.44-6.15

Fourth round: 6.14-4.85

Fifth round: 4.84-3.55

Sixth round: 3.54- 2.25

Seventh round: 2.24- .095

UDFA: 0.94-0.0  

 

Number 20: Hjayle Froholdt, Arkansas

IMG_2142
Hjalte Froholdt

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’4 and 311

Round Grade: 7

Number Grade: 2.17

Red Flags: None

 

Froholdt has in my top five interior linemen to start the season and it clearly it didn’t work out well. Froholdt moves super well for a bigger player there are plenty of reps of him getting to the second level and eating up linebackers. He’s a good puller into space as long as he doesn’t meet any resistance before the second level. I will probably say this a lot but offensive lineman needs to be excited to hit people. Froholdt doesn’t like to hit people and that’s a huge problem for me. He will shy away at contact at times and that is unacceptable for me. Froholdt has a lot of upside but I’m not sure he has the demeanor to make it in the NFL.

 

Number 19: Nate Herbig, Stanford

IMG_2143
Nate Herbig

Class: Junior

Height/Weight: 6’3 and 336

Round Grade: 6

Number Grade: 2.35

Red Flags: None

 

Herbig is a massive presence in the middle of the O-line when he wants to be. He has plenty of functional strength and athleticness to move people in space. Sometimes it looks like he doesn’t he respects his opponents enough. He will get lazy and not establish his hands quickly enough to control the rep. When pass blocking he as good hip and knee flexibility that allows him to build a pretty good base to absorb contact. Herbig, like Froholdt, isn’t physical enough for my liking. Herbig should get drafted and have an opportunity to make a 53-man roster.
Number 18: Terrone Prescod, North Carolina State

Image result for terronne prescod

Class: RS Senior

Height/Weight: 6’5 and 338

Round Grade: 6

Number Grade: 2.78

Red Flags: None

 

Prescod is a pure mauler from the guard spot with natural power built into his frame. He had plenty of reps where he uprooted opposing lineman deep in the trenches. He has a good anchor when he’s able to get back to it he can absorb defenders trying to bull rush him. First thing I noticed with Prescod is that he has a lot of sloppy weight on his frame. He doesn’t have great contact balance either so he ends up on the ground a little too much for me. Prescod is a pretty slow mover in general so he doesn’t offer a whole lot of upside. Prescod has a chance to make a 53-man roster but won’t be everyone’s cup of tea.

 

Number 17: Lamont Gillard, Georgia

Image result for lamont gaillard georgia

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’2 and 295

Round Grade: 6

Number Grade: 3.06

Red Flags: None

 

I’m probably way lower than most people will be on Gillard but hear me out first. He’s just not a good mover in space. Mobility is something that is becoming more and more necessary for modern-day interior linemen. With that said, he does have some appealing traits that project well to the league. He’s got good power at the point of attack where he shows the ability to move people out of there lanes. He has strong hands but he doesn’t land a good enough punch for them to be effective at times. Gillard has a chance to compete for a starting spot but he will probably be a backup in year one.

 

Number 16: Garrett Brumfield, LSU

Image result for garrett brumfield lsu

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’2 and 299

Round Grade: 5

Number Grade: 3.59

Red Flags: None

 

Brumfield is one of the more athletic linemen in this class. He’s a free mover in space and can make a lot of good plays at the second level. He plays with a good pad level and knows how to take advantage of leverage he is given. I like that Brumfield will look for work if he is left unblocked. He doesn’t always find it quickly but at least he looks for it. Brumfield is a bit of a technical mess when it comes to the passing game. He has a false step that leads to him getting beat by speed rushers way too often. He will get clowned by swim moves at times leading to some big hits in the backfield. Brumfield has some upside to make an impact at the next level but he’s got a long way to go.

 

Number 15: Lester Cotton, Alabama

Image result for lester cotton alabama

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’3 and 324

Round Grade: 5

Number Grade: 3.70

Red Flags: None

 

Lester Cotton is the least talked about Alabama offensive linemen from this year. Cotton is a powerhouse of a run blocker. He’s got some plays on his tape where he just rag-dolls a defending player out of the play. He has really good hand placement when he fires straight out in the running game controlling a lot of reps from the inside. He’s got a pretty anchor that he uses to absorb contact from opposing defenders and stalemate them. The problem with Cotton is that he isn’t a great athlete in space. He really struggles to get to the second level and struggles when asked to pull out in front of the play. Cotton has a really low floor as a starter in a run-heavy offense. His ceiling as a player is limited though because of his athleticness.

 

Number 14: Jon Baker, Boston College

Image result for jon baker boston college

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’2 and 300

Round Grade: 5

Number Grade: 4.01

Red Flags: Injured most of his Junior season.

 

Baker played center for one of the best run blocking teams in the country this season at Boston College. Baker has some impressive leg drive which allows him to move defenders down the field. Baker has a great anchor that really eats up power rushers typically pushing them to the ground. I saw Baker do a good job handling twists and stunts up front communicating with his Boston College teammates. The big issue with Baker is that he has not been able to stay healthy for his college career. Baker also has some athletic limitations that will lower his overall upside at the next level. He has enough tools to be a spot starter in the NFL but will spend most of his time as a backup.

 

Number 13: Michael Jordan, Ohio State

Image result for michael jordan ohio state

Class: Junior

Height/Weight: 6’6 and 310

Round Grade: 5

Number Grade: 4.15

Red Flags: None

 

 

Mike Jordan is sadly not the guard equivalent of Michael Jordan the basketball player. He does, however, have a really good frame for working in the middle with a sturdy lower half. He has good leg drive and always keeps them going even if he is stalemating someone. Jordan false steps so often that I actually stopped watching his tape because I was getting angry. He will let his base get narrow at times which lead to him tripping on his own feet a couple of times. Jordan gets out of his stance pretty quickly so that will mask some of his issues at times. Jordan could start in spots, but he’s a backup if you’re asking me.
Number 12: Beau Benzschawel, Wisconsin

Image result for beau benzschawel wisconsin

Class: RS Senior

Height/Weight: 6’5 and 317

Round Grade: 5

Number Grade: 4.46

Red Flags: None

 

The Wisconsin offensive line was the best in the nation this past year and is sending many players to the next level. Benzschawel is the one who gets the least amount of love in the media, but he has some strengths. He has a great anchor and can absorb defenders like a sponge in the middle of the line. He does a good job bullying defenders at the point of attack creating holes for his runners. Benzschawel lacks good contact balance and will get knocked onto one foot way too easy. In his pass sets, he can stand too straight up at times and lose leverage which leads to him getting pushed back into the pocket. Benzschawel has the same outlook as Jordan. A spot starter who should be a primary backup.

 

Number 11: Ross Pierschbacher, Alabama

Image result for ross pierschbacher

Class: RS Senior

Height/Weight: 6’4 and 304

Round Grade: 4

Number Grade: 5.04

Red Flags: None

 

Pierschbacher might be a hot commodity in the middle rounds when draft night rolls around. Plenty of teams are hunting for a plug and play starting center and there isn’t that many in this class. The former product Alabama has the perfect size and frame combined with multiple years of experience that teams will love. Pierschbacher is technically sound with his hand usage and frequent use of leverage to win his battles. My big knock on Pierschbacher is that he isn’t a great athlete in space. He’s not gonna be effective when asked to pull out in front of runs and will struggle with faster linebackers at the second level. Overall, he could come in and start day one if needed.

 

Number 10: Nate Davis, UNC-Charlotte

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Nate Davis

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’3 and 311

Round Grade: 4

Number Grade: 5.31

Red Flags: None

 

Davis is someone I found when doing research for the Senior Bowl back in February. He’s a small school player so it took me a while to get enough tape on him to feel good about my grade. Davis played some tackle in his career but his tape on the interior of the line is way better. Davis is a great run blocker who drives defenders down the field with strength alone. I liked Davis’s ability to move well in space and take good angles for his blocks giving him good leverage. Davis has some problems with consistency, especially, in his pass sets. He will false step at times which leads to him getting beat. Davis can sometimes get off balance if he doesn’t fire out of his stance quickly. Davis is a high upside pick with some ability to start now if a team desperately needs it.

 

Number 9: Connor Mcgovern, Penn State

Image result for connor mcgovern penn state

Class: Junior

Height/Weight: 6’5 and 323

Round Grade: 3

Number Grade: 6.28

Red Flags: None

 

Mcgovern is super athletic with fantastic body control in space. He does a great job quickly getting up to the second level to eat linebackers alive. I like his anchor in pass protection when he’s able to get back into it quickly enough. I saw him uproot a couple of defenders in the running game which tells me he might be stronger than he plays at times. Mcgovern has some trouble when he has to take deeper pass sets because he allows his base to become too narrow. Mcgovern also struggled to pick up blitzes at Penn State at times. Mcgovern can be a year one starter but I would like to see him sit for a year so his high upside can be groomed.

 

Number 8: Ben Powers, Oklahoma

Image result for ben powers oklahoma

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’4 and 313

Round Grade: 3

Number Grade: 6.39

Red Flags: None

 

Powers is the first of two interior offensive linemen to come from Oklahoma this season. Powers does a great job creating leverage at the line of scrimmage while uprooting and driving back defenders with ease. He looked like an effective puller into space with enough acceleration to get to the edge in the run game. Powers is a super physical player and will attempt to finish just about anybody in the running and passing game. Powers lacks the athletic ability to be considered a high upside player. He doesn’t have a lot of use in space and sometimes can get beat by pure burst from defenders. What you see is what you get with Powers which is a decent multi-year starter.

 

Number 7: Dru Samia, Oklahoma

Image result for dru samia oklahoma

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’5 and 297

Round Grade: 3

Number Grade: 6.66

Red Flags: None

 

Samia is the second interior linemen from Oklahoma to crack the top 10 this year. I loved the way Samia mirrored defenders when pass blocking and his ability to use his hands to stun defenders. Samia is a solid athlete who moves well in space and is much more effective player at the second level than his teammate Powers. I like Samia’s reps when he was asked to pull out in front of running plays. Samia is a smaller frame than most interior linemen do which can cause some issues for him at times. His anchor is decent, but sometimes he will get bullied in the run game by more physical players. Samia can be a starter from day one if the scheme is zone and pass heavy.

 

Number 6: Erick McCoy, Texas A@M

Image result for erik mccoy

Class: RS Junior  

Height/Weight: 6’3 and 310

Round Grade: 2

Number Grade: 7.63

Red Flags: None

 

McCoy is a really solid plug and play center who blew up after the Senior Bowl where he dominated a lot of reps. McCoy is great as a pass blocker with quick feet to mirror speed rushers and the anchor to absorb power rushers. He has some nice grip strength in his hands allowing him to rag-doll some defenders out of the way. His smooth footwork works well in a zone run blocking scheme where he creates plenty of room for his runners. He doesn’t have the ideal length in the middle and it can show up at times. McCoy is going to start for someone day one if he goes to the right scheme fit.

 

Number 5: Mike Dieter, Wisconsin

IMG_2141
Mike Dieter

Class: RS Senior

Height/Weight: 6’6 and 320

Round Grade: 2

Number Grade: 7.65

Red Flags: None

 

The most appealing part of Dieter’s game is his ability to move freely in space despite his massive size. He’s able to do that through exceptional footwork and solid body control. Dieter is experienced at multiple spots on the offensive line including right tackle but I think he fits better at guard. Dieter does a great job keeping his hands inside of his assignment which allows him to control reps at the line of scrimmage with ease. My concerns with Dieter have to do with his lack of length which is why I think he is better on the inside. Sometimes he doesn’t get full extension allowing the defender to get up into his chest and control the rep. Dieter can start at either guard spot or at right tackle if a team is that desperate.

Number 4: Elgton Jenkins, Mississippi State

IMG_2588
Elgton Jenkins

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’4 and 313

Round Grade: 2

Number Grade: 7.74

Red Flags: None

 

Jenkins is a player I’ve been high on since the beginning of the season and I’ve stayed pat on that love. Jenkins is a smooth mover in the middle with a strong anchor that absorbs power rushers well. He finds good leverage in the run game through stout hand usage leading to him uproot some defenders. Jenkins has experience playing all three interior spots in college so he has plenty of versatility. His ability at the second level is top notch making him a good modern day center. Jenkins lacks some natural power in his frame which makes me think he is a zone scheme specific player at the next level. He can struggle sometimes in 1v1 situations with speed rushers because of a lack of length. Jenkins could start from day one depending on the scheme he gets drafted to.

 

Number 3: Chris Lindstrom, Boston College

IMG_2398
Chris Lindstrom

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’4 and 305

Round Grade: 2

Number Grade: 8.09

Red Flags: None

 

Lindstrom is an elite run blocker from one of the best college lines in the country this past season. He fires out of his stance quickly and creates space with his leg drive. His first punch is strong and typically has a good location stunning defenders in their tracks. Lindstrom did not get a lot of chances to pass block 1v1 but I liked what I saw in his limited reps. He showed off a good anchor and showed enough mirror skills to project well to the next level. Lindstrom is another player who I think has to be in a zone scheme to be successful at the next level. He lacks some of the elite athletic traits you like to see from guards today. Lindstrom could start for a team who is running a zone-heavy scheme from day one.

 

Number 2: Dalton Risner, Kansas State

IMG_2139
Dalton Risner

Class: Senior

Height/Weight: 6’5 and 308

Round Grade: 2

Number Grade: 8.37

Red Flags: None

 

My favorite part of Risner’s game is his versatility along the line. You might see some draft analyst rank him as a tackle prospect, but I like him better at guard or center. He showed great mirror skills in pass protection and a fantastic anchor to eat bull rushers alive. I loved his meanness in the run game plowing people back and off the line of scrimmage. Risner does a great job in space seeking out someone to hit and then punishing them into the ground. He uses his grip strength to control defenders in the run game fairly well. The cons of Risner come down to him being limited as an athlete. He doesn’t have the most explosive traits or best quickness in the world. Risner isn’t scheme specific and depending on the team could start at three different positions day one.

 

Number 1: Garrett Bradbury, North Carolina State

IMG_2635

Class: RS Senior

Height/Weight: 6’3 and 300

Round Grade: 1

Number Grade: 9.03

Red Flags: None

 

Bradbury is a run blocking savant in the middle of the line. He always plays with good hand placement and leverage. He’s of the smoothest movers in this class getting to the second level to seal off linebackers. His foot speed is elite which gives him a great advantage when pass blocking on an island. I love his football IQ in the middle of the line handling rushers and blitzers from all angles of the field. My only issue with Bradbury is his lack of pure strength which he masks by using advanced technique. If your team needs a starting center then Bradbury should be the first guy off the board and a day one starter with pro-bowl potential.

 

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